Kiefer Sutherland says he’s open to returning as Jack Bauer for more ’24’

"I’ve always left the door slightly ajar if someone comes up with a great idea"

Kiefer Sutherland has admitted that he’s open to the idea of returning for more episodes of 24.

The star played Jack Bauer for nine seasons before the show wrapped up in 2014.

He previously said he wouldn’t rule out reprising the role in 2016 and now Sutherland’s admitted again he is open to the idea.

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“I’ve always left the door slightly ajar for 24 if someone comes up with a great idea,” the actor told Forbes.

“As an actor, 24 remains one of the most dynamic experiences I’ve ever had. Where a character was allowed to have such highs and lows in such a fast period of time is a gift.

“There are very few setups that will allow you to do that, and I find that incredibly fun, challenging, and exciting. There’s been nine seasons, and I think it rests in a credible place. The difficulty is you don’t ever want to do anything that is going to damage that.”

Sutherland also said he wouldn’t mind what form the show would take, whether it returned as a series or a movie.

“I’ve been banging my head against a brick wall for a movie for so long that I’ve got a concussion,” he said. “Honestly, the form more 24 would take doesn’t matter to me as much as the quality of the story.

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“If someone comes up with a great story that can be told in two hours, then we’re going to make a movie, but if someone comes up with a great story that could be 24 hours, we’ll do the show.”

Sutherland was among a host of stars who recently paid tribute to late director Joel Schumacher.

He starred in some of Schumacher’s best-known films including The Lost Boys in 1987, Flatliners in 1990, A Time To Kill in 1996 and Phone Booth in 2003, describing the late filmmaker as “one of my dearest friends.”

“His joy, spirit and talent will live on in my heart and memory for the rest of my life. Joel gave me opportunities and lifelong lessons […] His mark on modern culture and film will live on forever.”

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