Ricky Gervais hits out at celebrities for viral ‘Imagine’ singing video: “It was an awful rendition”

"But they might have been doing it for good reasons."

Ricky Gervais has shared his opinion on the viral video that showed a host of celebrities performing a cover of John Lennon’s ‘Imagine’.

Last month, Wonder Woman star Gal Gadot led a star-studded rendition of the iconic song as coronavirus spread across the globe.

In a video posted to Instagram, Gadot began singing Lennon’s seminal track, before the likes of Will Ferrell, Jamie Dornan and Natalie Portman joined in in an attempt to lift spirits.

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The video proved to be divisive, with many social media users saying the celebrities misplaced their efforts. Now, Gervais has joined in admitting he was not a fan.

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Ricky Gervais. CREDIT: Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images

During an interview on BBC Radio 5 Live, he said: “That ‘Imagine’ video, it’s not that bad, they’re probably very nice people.

“It was an awful rendition, but they might have been doing it for good reasons, to help these normal nobodies.”

He added: “But they’re going ‘My film’s coming up and I’m not on telly – I need to be in the public eye’, not all of them but some of them.

“You can see in their eye – ‘I could cry at the beauty of my personality, I’m just so beautiful for doing this’ and everyone sees that – we get it.”

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Meanwhile, Gervais has spoken out against those “complaining” from privileged positions while the NHS continues to fight coronavirus during the global pandemic.

The comedian said in an interview with The Sun that he had little sympathy for anyone tasked with staying at home, following celebrities posting videos from lavish homes.

The second season of After Life, starring Gervais, arrives on Netflix today (April 24).

The comedy-drama sees Gervais starring as Tony Johnson, a man who is struggling to cope with widowed life following the death of his wife.

In a four-star review, NME’s Beth Webb said the second series of After Life is Gervais’ “most moving work to date.”

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