Watch Joe Pesci reminisce about ‘Home Alone’ as he watches Macaulay Culkin’s recent return as Kevin McCallister

"Here's my big part!"

Joe Pesci has returned in a new advert for Google where he reminisces about his role as Harry in Home Alone. 

The video follows on from Macaulay Culkin’s recent return as Kevin McCallister in which he reprised his role as the abandoned child from the iconic film, only this time updated for the modern day. The original film, released in 1990, saw Culkin being catapulted to fame in the role of a burglar-bashing child.

In the advertisement, released just before Christmas, Culkin once again played Kevin, only this time he is seen planning for the burglars imminent arrival using a host of Google devices. You can watch the original advert here:

Now, a follow up meta-advertisement has been released in which Pesci can be seen watching Culkin’s advert and discussing his character Harry, who starred in the original Home Alone, as well as the sequel, Home Alone: Lost in New York. As Culkin appears on the screen, Pesci can be seen watching the clip with his friends saying “I love this.”

Later on, he is seen asking everyone in a busy room to quieten down so everyone can listen to his “big line” from the movie: “we better get out of here before somebody sees us.” Towards the end, he adds: “I nailed it.”

Meanwhile, On Twitter, 38-year-old Culkin spoke about Pesci’s appearance, joking “how come Pesci didn’t have to get into costume?!” You can watch the new advertisement here:

Last year, Culkin opened up on his experiences filming Home Alone, and why he struggles to watch the Christmas classic almost 28 years after its original release.

He revealed, during an appearance on Ellen, that he can’t watch the film without remembering what was happening on set during the filming of a particular scene.

He said “I can’t watch it the same way other people do” and described the film as “background radiation at Christmastime.”

He also admitted that people have asked to watch it with him, an offer he described as both “flattering and creepy.”