A decade in music – 50 best albums of 2005

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50. Test Icicles, ‘For Screening Purposes Only’. NME said: “The most terrifyingly awesome DIY hardcore-rap-metal mash-up since, well, ever.”

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49. Dead Meadow, ‘Feathers’. NME said: “Pretty much just one, long, meandering folk-metal jam.”

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47. Sleater-Kinney, ‘The Woods’. NME said: “The roughest, rawest, meatiest rock album of the year.”

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46. The Duke Sprit, ‘Cuts Across The Land’. NME said: “Shamefully overlooked, it’s one that will grow over time.”

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45. Shout Out Louds, ‘Howi Howi Gaff Gaff’. NME said: “The most instantly likeable album of the year.”

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44. Field Music, ‘Field Music’. NME said: “Gorgeous pop songs.”

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43. Engineers, ‘Engineers’. NME said: “Like a hand-crafted platinum eagle-monster streaking the sky crying elegiac symphonies to cathedrals crushed flat.”

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41. Nine Black Alps, ‘Everything’. NME said: “Distilled the teen spirit of Seattle grunge into their angsty, moshpit-friendy debut.”

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40. Brakes, ‘Give Blood’. NME said: “Genius, askew pop gems.”

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38. Autolux, ‘Future Perfect’. NME said: “Making the long outdated sounds of shoegazing relevant to the 21st century.”

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37. Circulus, ‘The Lick On The Tip Of An Envelope Yet To Be Sent’. NME said: “Beautiful, fey and silly – but never, ever boring.”

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36. The Bravery, ‘The Bravery’. NME said: “There was more to The Bravery than just riffs, quaffs and inner-band tiffs.”

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35. Elbow, ‘Leaders Of The Free World’. NME said: “Touching, evocative, pop-prog bundled up in a heart.”

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34. Rufus Wainwright, ‘Want Two’. NME said: “Enough raw-edged emotion and stupendous songwriting to enchant all but the most ragged-arsed indie kid.”

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33. We Are Scientists, ‘With Love And Squalor’. NME said: “The funniest fuckers in rock’n’roll. Ace.”

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32. Queens Of The Stone Age, ‘Lullabies To Paralyze’. NME said: “The heavyweights of sludge rock return to shoot 10,000 volts of pure sonic aggression at the horned-hand masses.”

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31. Bright Eyes, ‘I’m Wide Awake, It’s Morning’. NME said: “Possesses a warm, beating heart that says it’s OK to feel alone. Reassuringly life-affirming.”

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30. Doves, ‘Some Cities’. NME said: “A record to restore your faith in the Big Themes and great, crafted British songwriting.”

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26. Super Furry Animals, ‘Love Kraft’. NME said: “The most summery record of the year.”

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25. MIA, ‘Arular’. NME said: “A genre-straddling debut of mind-boggling squelchy disco-rap from the Sri Lankan Lady Sov.”

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24. Oasis, ‘Don’t Believe The Truth’. NME said: “Suddenly back into primetime, as Oasis snarled again with gonzo rock’n’roll rage.”

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23. Hard-Fi, ‘Stars Of CCTV’. NME said: “An insightful portrait of modern British life.”

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22. The Raveonettes, ‘Pretty In Black’. NME said: “A sugar-coated but nonetheless vicious walk on the wild side.”

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21. LCD Soundsystem, ‘LCD Soundsystem’. NME said: “Not only did James Murphy ‘save’ dance music…but he did it while wearing Salvation Army chic and having an ever-present covering of ginger stubble.”

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20. Editors, ‘The Back Room’. NME said: “Welcome the new lords of the dark.”

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19. Coldplay, ‘X & Y’. NME said: “Kraftwerk-inspired, globe-straddling third album from Coldplay.”

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17. The Magic Numbers, ‘The Magic Numbers’. NME said: “Country-rocking debut from embraceable hippy siblings.”

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15. Maximo Park, ‘A Certain Trigger’. NME said: “Stuffed from arse-to-beak with rollocking art-pop klang.”

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13. The Rakes, ‘Capture/Release’. NME said: “The Rakes are proof that art rock geek gangs in 2005 can be deeply funny.”

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10. Gorillaz, ‘Demon Days’. NME said: “The mainstream’s darkest, most dangerous and downright weirdest album of the year.”

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8. Kanyne West, ‘Late Registration’. NME said: “West has proved a sharp mind is the rap accessory that matters.”

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7. Sufjan Stevens, ‘Illinois’. NME said: “The sheer jaw-dropping scale of Sufjan Stevens’ ambition was exposed.”

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6. The White Stripes, ‘Get Behind Me Satan’. NME said: “A darker and at times funkier melange of country and blues-rock than he’s given us before, but still as jaw-droppingly eccentrically brilliant.”

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5. Kaiser Chiefs, ‘Employment’. NME said: “12 good, old-fashioned, anthemic indie rock songs that made up their debut album and filled dancefloors at indie clubs everywhere.”

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4. Antony And The Johnsons, ‘I Am A Bird Now’. NME said: “One of the oddest – and therefore most welcome – success stories of 2005.”

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3. Franz Ferdinand, ‘You Could Have It So Much Better’. NME said: “An album that encompasses epic balladry… Cheshire-grinning psychedelia… and the best song you’ve ever written (‘The Fallen’).”

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1. Bloc Party, ‘Silent Alarm’. NME said: “The album was all those things British guitar bands’ debut albums usually forget to be: confident in stance, wide in range, global in outlook and brimming with ambition and ideas.”

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