Pink Floyd’s album sleeves explained

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'Wish You Were Here' (1975) album liner bag, designed by Storm Thorgerson. During the making of the album, Thorgerson claims that Pink Floyd were "not entirely together as a band", which is where the concept of absence for the album came from. Thorgerson's designs can be seen in his new book, 'Mind Over Matter 4 - The Images Of Pink Floyd' and at London's OXO Gallery from July 24 - August 10.

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Matt Salacuse/NME
'Echoes - The Best of Pink Floyd' (2001). This cover features images and concepts from previous albums: the pig from the 'Animals' album, the cow from 'Atom Heart Mother', the swimmer and liner bag from 'Wish You Were Here', the maid from 'A Momentary Lapse Of Reason' and the masks from 'Is There Anybody Out There?'.

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Rex
'A Momentary Lapse Of Reason' (1987). This was the first album after Roger Waters left and Pink Floyd continued as Nick Mason and David Gilmour. Thorgerson was brought in to give it a 'Floyd look'. "This 'divorce' was marred by such bitterness and acrimony , and the aftertaste lingered for some years. It still does, in my opinion." Storm Thorgerson's designs can be seen up close at London's OXO Gallery from July 24 - August 10.

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Pamela Littky/NME
'Sound of Thunder' (1988). This image is inspired by surrealist artist Meret Oppenheim's sculpture 'Object (Le Déjeuner en fourrure)' - otherwise known as a cup and saucer covered in fur - as well as the disturbing dreamscapes of Salvador Dali. Sleeve designer Storm Thorgerson claims, "it also comes from being at a gig and thinking how can I sum up Floyd live - Mr Light meets Mr Sound".

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This image of a swimmer in the Yuma Desert, titled 'The Meaning of Life', was first seen in Pink Floyd's 'Wish You Were Here' songbook designed by Storm Thorgerson. "It shows an absence of purpose - he just swims on going nowhere." Storm Thorgerson's distinctive designs can be seen in his new book, 'Mind Over Matter 4 - The Images Of Pink Floyd' and at London's OXO Gallery from July 24 - August 10.

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Andy Willsher/NME
This image, 'Interstellar Poster', featured in Pink Floyd's 'Interstellar' exhibition (taken from the album 'Interstellar Overdrive' (1967)) at Le Cite De La Musique in Paris in 2003. The balls represent infinity and multiple layers. "I fancifully imagined that the secret of the Floyd was contained therein," explains artist Storm Thorgerson, who has also designed album sleeves for Led Zeppelin, Audioslave and Biffy Clyro.

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'Animals' (1977). The image shows the now infamous pig, which is synonymous with Pink Floyd's live shows, floating over Battersea Power Station in south west London. It took three days to get the shot which was used, and on the second day the pig escaped and floated into the path of planes bound for Heathrow Airport. Thirty years later the porcine gadabout escaped again, this time at Roger Waters' performance at Coachella Festival.

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This image is taken from Pink Floyd's thirtieth anniversary super audio CD release (SACD) in 2003. In the CD booklet there are a total of 30 images each connected to the prism design including a traffic lights sign, a samosa and a snooker triangle. Storm Thorgerson's designs can be seen in his new book, 'Mind Over Matter 4 - The Images Of Pink Floyd' and at London's OXO Gallery from July 24 - August 10.
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