This week’s NME (October 22 2008)

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The Last Shadow Puppets are this week’s NME cover stars. Here the pair are pictured playing at Wolverhamptonâ

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In this week’s NME we introduce La Roux. For those of you that haven’t yet heard of her don’t feel bad, after all she hasn’t yet played a single gig yet, having boxed herself into the studio to finish her album. Head to NME.COM/RADAR for a free La Roux download.

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Alex Turner and Miles Kane confess to NME this week that there will indeed be a second Last Shadow Puppets album in the future. Alex said: "We definitely will. It’s a bit difficult getting a timeframe sorted though. Heâ

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Another band featured in this week’s NME are Rolo Tomassi. Specialising in "earfucks of lacerating noise", the Sheffield noiseniks are marked out by vocalist Eva Spence, whose voice sounds like "Satan’s daughter swearing dark vengeance on the Lord".

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Elbow prove they are now one of Britain’s best-loved groups as they take to the Roundhouse stage in London. "It felt like we were playing in my frontroom," remarked frontman Guy Garvey, noting the warmth and affection coming from the crowd. The gig is reviewed in this week’s NME.

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Wesleyan University in Connecticut has spawned artists such as MGMT, Amazing Baby and Santogold – and there’s a lot more to follow. In this week’s issue we investigate the university famous for producing endless writers, producers and general bigwigs in Hollywood.

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In 12 Steps this week we explore the connections between Damon Albarn, Dr Dre, Snoop Dog, Blondie and Lily Allen. How exactly are these stars all related? Get this week’s NME to find out.

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In this week’s issue of NME cover stars The Last Shadow Puppets give their final ever interview as a duo before Alex heads back to Arctic Monkeys. Find out how the affair ends, only in this week’s issue.

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Chairlift are the latest group to arrive from NYC and like Mirror Mirror or Effi Briest, look more like a cult to avoid than a band. Though we fail to dig their dress code, credit where it’s due – each song on this record does fizzle with an admirable lyrical complexity.

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