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Reviews Album Reviews

Album Reviews

Harry Styles – ‘Fine Line’ review: packed with personality and charm (and saucy lyrics)

The former One Directioner has come good on his early promise

XXXTentacion – ‘Bad Vibes Forever’ review: a posthumous record of thin, over-embellished material

The second album released since the rapper's death is a case of diminishing returns

Camila Cabello – ‘Romance’ review: earth-shattering pop tunes and tentative ballads

The Cuban-American pop queen deviates from her trademark sound on album number two

Liam Payne – ‘LP1’ review: eclectic sounds, but little depth

It's meant to showcase his maturity, but ‘LP1’ finds the former One Direction star so focused on ticking boxes that he forgets to have fun

Jack Peñate – ‘After You’ review: an impressively experimental album after a decade MIA

This comeback represents a bold new chapter for the indie hero

The Game – ‘Born 2 Rap’ review: a sprawling swan-song from an all-time great

The Game explores his legacy with classic samples and riffs on his signature material

Tinashe – ‘Songs For You’ review’: underrated pop star hopscotches from one sound to the next

Tinashe's fourth album boasts flashes of her distinct personality, which is also sometimes obscured by genre-hopping

William Patrick Corgan – ‘Cotillions’ review: Smashing Pumpkins frontman’s solo album is a mixed bag

This is more gentle and folky than his last solo album 'Ogilala’, but the famously controlling musician often overcooks his lyrics and melodies

03 Greedo & Kenny Beats – ‘Netflix & Deal’ review: a gifted storyteller shines throughout this neat conceit

The rapper, currently serving a 20-year stretch, has teamed up with super-producer Kenny Beats to craft an immersive movie-themed mixtape

Hannah Diamond – ‘Reflections’ review: the PC Music star, rumoured to be a robot, explores very human heartbreak

The Charli XCX collaborator has a gift for unknotting messy emotions, though the buoyant pop works better than the sluggish ballads

Coldplay – ‘Everyday Life’ review: a confounding experiment from a deceptively forward-thinking band

Chris Martin and co. take on heady themes of love, war, racism, faith, gun control, friendship, climate change, police brutality and more. This inventive eighth album is proof that Coldplay are more adventurous than they're often given credit for

Arxx – ‘Wrong Girl, Honey’ review: Brighton punks refuse to take any shit

The duo, who next week will play NME's latest Girls to The Front gig in London, part of our series that champions women and no-binary artists, are a vital addition to the punk landscape

Harry Nilsson – ‘Losst and Founnd’ review: 25 years since his death, this posthumous album sounds surprisingly current

He died in 1994, but on the massively influential singer-songwriter's first posthumous album, he sounds more like Mac DeMarco than Mac himself

Robbie Williams – ‘The Christmas Present’ review: the pop don’s festive gift is anything but a lump of coal

It's Chriiiiiiistmas! Well, not quite – unless you're in the Williams household. Robbie wants to relinquish Bublé’s icy grip on the festive season, and he might just get his wish

Nasty Cherry – ‘Season 1′ EP review: this Charli XCX-assembled band represents the coolest of sisterhoods

This bite-sized EP (five breakneck songs clock in at under five minutes) references disparate influences such as Haim and Prince. It's a Charli-endorsed riot

Beck – ‘Hyperspace’ review: the superstar singer-songwriter enters a daring new era

Beck takes on a new cosmic identity with aplomb, roping in Pharrell to achieve pop minimalism that proves there's no sound he can't excel at

The Who – ‘WHO’ review: 13 years since their last album, this stands up alongside their classics

Whether Roger Daltrey is bellowing through anti-war flamenco or slagging off copycat bands, The Who have lost none of their vim and vigour. Just don't mention Brexit

Leonard Cohen – ‘Thanks For The Dance’ review: posthumous album showcases fearless artistry right to the end

2016's 'You Want It Darker' was a fine full stop on Cohen's career. But this gentle collection justifies its existence with a cathartic energy that offers closure
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